Optimization of current postoperative period after childrens’ adenotomy

  • M. A. Georgiyants Kharkiv Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy
  • M. B. Pushkar Kharkiv Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy
  • E. V. Vysotska National University of Radio Electronics, Department of Biomedical Engineering
  • A. P. Porvan National University of Radio Electronics, Department of Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: adenotomy, children, intravenous anesthesia, inhalation anesthesia, emergence delirium, mathematical model

Abstract

The article studied the incidence of emergence delirium (ED) in children depending on the method of general anesthesia (GA) and identified predictors of ED. There was established, that after GA using sevoflurane ED occurred significantly more often than after GA using propofol or thiopental sodium (P = 0,014 and P = 0,001 respectively). The authors at first made mathematical models with consideration of ED independent predictors for surgery (heart rate, blood glucose level, average of the cardiac cycle, Baevsky’ stress index), which allow to choose optimal method of GA (with using propofol or sevoflurane) to conduct adenotomy and prevention of ED.

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References

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Published
2017-03-30
How to Cite
Georgiyants, M. A., Pushkar, M. B., Vysotska, E. V., & Porvan, A. P. (2017). Optimization of current postoperative period after childrens’ adenotomy. Likars’ka Sprava, (1-2), 115-119. Retrieved from https://liksprava.com/index.php/journal/article/view/25
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